Spectrum – A place of our own

Spectrum – A place of our own

Spectrum: Focus on Deaf Artists was an artists’ colony that ran in the late 1970s in Austin, Texas.  Video and Text summary of Spectrum by Christie and Durr – HeART of Deaf Culture: Literary and Artistic Expressions of Deafhood 2012

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2vkl–cR21A

Spectrum: Focus on Deaf Artists
Length: 17:32

Screen shot 2014-07-13 at 6.43.03 PMNote: This is a summary of the signed commentaries made in the video on Spectrum and not a verbatim translation. Text summary by Karen Christie and Patti Durr.  See video for all of the images mentioned below.

Variety of Deaf artists signing the word “spectrum”

Dr. Betty G. Miller signing Spectrum with fingers spread out as she sits in front of her painting of the Ranch at Spectrum

Dr. Betty G. Miller signing Spectrum with fingers spread out as she sits in front of her painting of the Ranch at Spectrum

Illustration for the sign for Spectrum appears
Spectrum: Focus on Deaf Artists 1975-1980
Deaf Artists’ Colony Austin, Texas

Chuck Baird: This was a new place where a variety of us Deaf artists could come together and do our thing. Such a thing had never existed before. A Hearing woman from Texas came here to start an art program for disabled kids. She was concerned about accessibility issues in the arts.

[Image from Spectrum Newsletter: Janette Norman with Deaf student in front of a bust in an art classroom.]

Betty G. Miller: Janette Norman, her namesign was a “J” on the palm of the hand, showed up at Gallaudet. I met her and she explained her idea about setting up a Deaf artists program, which I became fascinated with. I began to tell my Deaf friends about it and some of us decided to make the big move to Austin, Texas.

[Image from Spectrum Newsletter: Gathering of Deaf artist at World Congress of the Deaf, WFD 1975 in Washington DC to discuss the possibility of forming a Deaf Artists' colony]

Chuck Baird: Janette Norman came to us and asked us Deaf artists, “What dreams do you have?” We all looked at each other and said, “We’d like to have something like a Deaf artists’ colony,” and she returned to Austin and found some people with money. Then she notified those of us Deaf people who she had met in Washington, DC.

Paul Johnston: Chuck Baird had just graduated, and went to participate in the World Federation of the Deaf (WFD) convention. It was there that the idea got percolating about founding a Deaf artists’ center; a “utopia” so to speak. They decided to establish it in Austin, Texas. That was Spectrum.

Betty G. Miller: Some friends and I came out to Austin, Texas.

[Image of Betty G. Miller's painting "Spectrum: Focus on Deaf Artists"]

[Image showing Spectrum's Goals and Aspirations]

Chuck Baird: At that time we wanted to showcase the talents of Deaf artists nationally; to share their accomplishments and frustrations and how to make it across the communication barrier as some artists had done. We would publicize this via our newsletter, and we acted as a clearinghouse. Spectrum really served as an umbrella under which many of the projects were housed: theatre, TV & film, visual art, literature and dance. Spectrum had different projects for schools, and hosted art shows and theatre productions involving Deaf children and families. There was a summer camp for Deaf youth related to the arts and theatre. This is how we served the Austin community.

[Image of a map of the U.S. indicating the number of Deaf artists from each state who were part of the Spectrum Clearinghouse]

[Image of flyer on Spectrum]

Chart Vol.2 #2 May 1977[Image of Spectrum's organizational structure and representatives in 1977.

Image listing Spectrum's executive advisory board, its working board, its administration and office staff, and its Deaf artists advisory board]

[Image of Deaf Dancers painting by Betty G. Miller]

Chuck Baird: We got a federal grant for job training called CETA under Jimmy Carter’s administration. This was awesome, and for two or three years it allowed us to expand and grow. Many Deaf people from across the U.S. were thrilled to see what was happening here in Austin — something founded by, for and of Deaf artists, with a few Hearing people involved as interpreters or for fundraising and development. We, Deaf artists, were able to see ourselves as visual artists, theatre performers, writers and dancers.

[Image of Helen DeVitt Jones — patron to Spectrum] Patron Helen Jones

Nancy Creighton: She (Helen DeVitt Jones) was from a wealthy oil family and Spectrum was just one of her minor philanthropies. Her money paid all of the salaries for Betty, Charles, and Janette. CETA money covered everyone else, including myself.

I believe when Helen Jones’ sister – or someone in her family – was dying, and they needed to reconfigure their finances, so she had to stop supporting Spectrum.

The Ranch

[Illustration of the Ranch area entitled "Mt. Spectrum" by Chuck Baird]

c baird drawing of spectrum p 15 map drawing vol 3 no 2 june 1978

c baird drawing of spectrum p 15 map drawing vol 3 no 2 june 1978

Betty G. Miller: My friend, Clarence Russell, and I brought the ranch together.

[Image of young Betty with Clarence in front of wooden gate]

[photo of the ranch area with headlines Flash! Flash! Flash! We Move to the Ranch]

Betty G. Miller: The Ranch is where we had many of our Spectrum activities. We had Deaf artists there. Not everyone made works that were Deaf-themed, but there was a focus on Deaf life and providing Deaf artists with an opportunity to move forward with their artistic lives.

[Image of Chuck Baird from the late 1970s wearing a Spectrum t-shirt]

Chuck Baird: Welcome to Spectrum (fingerspelled and then signed) ranch. A group of us came together here to form the organization Spectrum: FODA — Focus on Deaf Artists. That (indicating building behind him) is where we would have meetings in the living room. The den became an office space; there was a kitchen, and down the hall was the bedroom area. This building belonged to Betty G. Miller and Clarence Russell, whose name sign was CR. At this time, many people were moving to Austin, and those two bought this area, which became our “headquarters.” Over there a bit was a small horse stall that we converted into a studio for producing our newsletter; doing the layout and illustrations, collecting slides, preserving materials and so forth. We also had a small outdoor stage, which was a platform. We had a home-made tent, which I made, and we erected it during the summer festivals where forty-plus Deaf artists would all convene for one-week. It really was our hey-day. We had a wonderful time. The first summer festival was in ’77 and the next one was in ’78. The second was a little larger, and took place here. Most people came from out of state and would stay with us as guests; we’d come together and leave and come together again. We also had an outdoor evening theatre with lights and people would flock to see it. There was about fifteen of us working here during the day with the two owners staying in the ranch house. Now there are many buildings here and guess what this has become? The Austin Zoo — believe it or not!

"Dr Betty G. Miller on Arts and the Deaf" vol 2 no 2 May 1977 - pix of Betty signing "art"

“Dr Betty G. Miller on Arts and the Deaf” vol 2 no 2 May 1977 – pix of Betty signing “art”

[Image with headline Dr. Betty G. Miller Director of Visual & Performing Arts School with a picture of Betty signing the word "art"]

Paul Johnston: I met Betty Miller and we kept in touch. She invited me out to visit Spectrum. This was during my senior year at RIT. I flew out and was really just an observer, chatting with people without having any real role or responsibility in Spectrum, as I was still a senior. When I visited her at Austin, Texas she showed me her portfolio at her home. Chuck had already mentioned what a phenomenal artist she was. I think Chuck had even shown me some pictures of Betty’s work — like a face with wires coming down from the ear and mechanical instruments. I could see how her work influenced Chuck’s work with his “The Mechanical Ear” painting. It was not a direct influence, but more of something that rests in the subconscious. It is typical for someone’s art to impact others from the same school of art. When she showed me her work, I thought wow — it was so strongly political. At that time, writing did not have a big effect, whereas art produced a much more powerful statement.

ASL and Acting

[Image of headlines "Unite in Support of Deaf Actors" and the ASL Column]

Dec. 1977 Vol.2 No.4 p.5 a play of our won[Images from Spectrum's "A Play of Own Own" production]

[Image of Liz Quinn with short biography]

[Image of Liz Quinn from the production of "Blue Angel"]

[Scroll with text: “… to Summer Conference for Deaf artists in Austin. ‘Land Ho.’ I found deaf feelings, deaf ideas, the deaf making decisions: the same motion as the sun, the sea, and the merry go-round. Sometimes I think, ‘Have I stayed too long with the sun and sea?’ My heart says, ‘NO, sail on Spectrum.” — Liz Quinn

Nancy Creighton: Liz Quinn sat me down and explained, “ASL is different. ASL is a visual language. You sign ENGLISH. We are STRONG ASL here.” She explained it all to me and I replied, “Thank you for teaching me because I’m totally clueless.” Although I realized at the time that their emphasis was on using ASL, it wasn’t until years later that I found out that everyone using and promoting ASL was a very radical and unique idea for that time. I didn’t know it then. I didn’t know anything about the history. I didn’t know anything simply because I had grown up entirely in the Hearing world. It wasn’t until much later that I realized how fortunate I was to have been exposed to that so early on.

Chuck Baird: In the living room of this house, we would have lively discussions about Deaf art lead by Betty G. Miller. Ten years later, De’VIA would be formulated but really its birthplace was right THERE through that door. Betty was really ahead of her time. De’VIA was coined later. Wow, I’m moved to see that coming towards me. (cuts to peacock walking towards Chuck) See that peacock there — you know how its back feathers will open up just like the sign for Spectrum. Far out, huh? Spectrum; it was colorful. It is like the feathers of that bird.

We had a stage, a platform here. I would say it was 30 by 30 feet. I remember there was a telephone pole that had an electrical outlet, and we powered the lights from it.

This building used to have horse stalls, as I told you before. We converted it into a studio space for layout work and a darkroom. It took us one year to renovate the building because it was stop and go depending on the funding coming in, which enabled us to buy the supplies, such as wall board. Five or six of us worked here in this space: our editor in chief, our photographer, another person who was responsible for the newsletter lay-out, and someone who typed up the articles.

[Images from Spectrum newsletters — Three people digging in front of the horse stall, a woman working on the framing for the renovation and other images of the renovations]

[Painting of "Spectrum Deaf Artists" by Betty G. Miller]

Betty Miller: This is a painting of a building that was part of Spectrum ranch. It was not the building we lived in but rather one in which we did various activities. There are three different artists featured in the painting. The man on the right is Clarence Russell (CR), the man in the middle is Reggie Egnatovich (name sign – R on the chin), and the man next to him is Guy Wonder. You may have noticed that in many of my paintings I have lines running down from the mouth to the bottom of the chin — this is to indicate they had been raised orally. This man in the middle was VERY Deaf, which means he was ‘very ASL,’ but still he had been raised being required to speak. In the background, you can see an American flag where the stars have been replaced with hands. This shows that we were AMERICANS — not just some folks out in the world, but that we were part of the U.S.A.

Summer Conferences: Images from Spectrum Newsletters

[Images from newsletters - Susan Jackson handling registration, Ralph Miller signing with Guy Wonder in the background, Ralph Miller posing for a painting by Bill Sparks, painting of Ralph Miller by Bill Sparks, festival participants watching a presentation under the tent, the advisory board in discussion under the tent, Charlie B. signing, Patrick Graybill signing "English!," Dorothy Miles signing "Spectrum."]

[Text from Dorothy Miles' poem]

SPECTRUM

Colors,
Pure colors
Red, orange
yellow, green
blue
Purple deep, purple light —
each one alone
beautiful, strong and free —
merge,
blend,
into a clear
White
light,
shining that we may see
the Sign.
Thus
let us unite —
each one alone a color
beautiful, strong and free —
join hands
finger by finger
blending
into a clear
new
light . . . .
dark
errors, misunderstandings,
jealousies, frustrations
receding from
the light of our world,
shining
that we may understand
the Signs.
Dorothy Miles
July 13, 1976

Betty Miller: Really, it was an amazing experience to be involved with Spectrum. It affected every one of

Betty signing "look back"

Betty signing “look back”

us. I learned to appreciate dance, and I hadn’t seen Deaf dancers prior to Spectrum. Meeting so many Deaf artists was really inspirational for me. Even though we had many conflicts, as a whole it was remarkable. We were all brave Deaf people to move from our homes to start such a venture. Now, when I look back I’m in awe. Since that time, I have never seen anything like it.

 

 

De’VIA’s 25th & Beyond – Building the Mt More

Deaf View/Image Art De’VIA is celebrating its 25th anniversary in style.  Don’t know what De’VIA is – dont feel badly – lots of folks dont but once they do – wow wee they really do take off.

Screen shot 2014-07-03 at 11.05.12 PM

Dr. Betty G. Miller standing in front of a large blank canvas wearing a enormous smile and a flowered black shirt – still frame from historical footage from the 1989 De’VIA think tank.

Deaf View/Image Art is a term that was coined in 1989 by 9 Deaf artists to name works expressing the Deaf experience.  Works about the Deaf-world had been created prior to 1989 but they were usually lumped in with any works by Deaf artists not depicting the Deaf experience and generically termed Deaf art.

See a short 19 minute video on the history of De’VIA think tank at:

http://dsdj.gallaudet.edu/index.php?issue=5&section_id=6&entry_id=198

The name came from ASL first – the group of artists discussed at length what to call this new art movement and can came up with:

Deaf View/Image Art

chuck devia

View/Image

( sign for view is pointed at a 5 handshape for image which represents a canvas or piece of paper) – the slash / connotes it is a combination sign.  So the view is about how Deaf people see the world they live in and the image is how they express this experience (the motifs, themes, colors etc they call upon)

They came up with an abbreviation of De’VIADe = Deaf (they wanted to keep the Deaf pride without having Hearing people think of the full word as they so often think in pathological terms) and added an to give the term a foreign feel as many Deaf people note that they feel alien (not treated as an equal member of their country or even this planet) and also to indicated that the term De’VIA came from another language (ASL) and as a nod to Laurent Clerc and France for having given us LSF that evolved into our ASL.  the VIA part stand for the View/Image Art 

De’VIA has embedded and flowed over the past 25 years – often soaring based on the profound and prolific images of its strongest artists.  the De’VIA exhibits curated by Brenda Schertz for the Deaf Studies conferences and other shows hosted throughout the country from time to time were a huge boost to the growth of De’VIA before the digital age but it was not until the advent of an understanding of audism, Deaf gain, and Deafhood that we have seen De’VIA move from being a movement of art to a movement of the people.

With an increased collective consciousness via Deafhood and critical literacy about human rights, language rights, the art and activism of disenfranchised groups, and of course the huge heart and hardihood of our contemporary De’VIA artists and the use of social media, we have seen an invigorating and inspiring amount of De’VIA creations and on the ground activism.  A subset of De’VIA is emerging via its ARTivists – folks who are not just content to create and showcase their works but artists who are eager to get their feet on the ground hitting the pavement to bring about social change via their work and their feet.  We STAND. ^

The artivist (artist +activist) uses her artistic talents to fight and struggle against injustice and oppression—by any medium necessary. The artivist merges commitment to freedom and justice with the pen, the lens, the brush, the voice, the body, and the imagination. The artivist knows that to make an observation is to have an obligation. ~ MK Asante, Jr.

So last year when the Olathe, Kansas’ Deaf Cultural Center (DCC) and the Kansas School for the Deaf (KSD) invited a group of De’VIA artists to come together to examine the past, present and posterity of De’VIA at the threshold of De’VIA turning 25 – we had a grand time.  An extraordinary time.  An audism free time.  (see http://handeyes.wordpress.com/2013/09/01/viva-devia-in-olathe-kansas/ and scroll down for the PDF which contains many new De’VIA works from a wide variety of artists).  A marvelous mural was made and is being reproduced to be included in a De’VIA curriculum kit to be sent to

De'VIA Totem 2014

De’VIA Totem 2014

Deaf schools and programs so that children and young adults will not have to say “I wish I knew about De’VIA a long time ago.”   A De’VIA totem was also created at the Kansas 2013 retrea and can be seen along with the mural at the link above. 

Gallaudet hosted a De’VIA anniversary exhibit in April of 2014 and NTID is hosting a De’VIA exhibit and banquet Oct-November, 2014 – see the call for submissions – http://www.rit.edu/ntid/dyerarts/devia25th/call-to-artists.  There will be numerous other shows and booth/festivals throughout the country this year and a retreat for Deaf artists is happening at the Aspen Deaf Camp Aug 14-20 http://www.aspencamp.org/deafviewartretreat. (scroll down for complete listing of events)

At the retreat last year in Kansas, several artists expressed a need for a De’VIA curriculum as so many Deaf schools and programs do not teach about De’VIA.  This past week (June 27 – July 1, 2014), fifteen artists and art teachers came together to work on lesson plans, create materials and develop a curriculum.  It was an intense and whirlwind time.  We are extremely fortunate and grateful to have been able to stay at the Rochester School for the Deaf as we worked all day and long into the nights.  Hopefully a pilot set of materials with a mural replica will be tested out this year during De’VIA’s 25th and tweaked and finalized so that we finally have a NATIONAL De’VIA curriculum.  Its long overdue and im so happy it is happening.

It was my great honor and pleasure to get to know all of these amazing, caring, creative, kind, funny, generous, and good folks.  It really feeds my soul to discover more and more folks who share, dare, and care.  I would like to go on and on but im still trying to catch up on my sleep and my brain is still a bit scrambled with so much ground we covered.

my heart is grateful and will be so eternally.  “Gratitude is the memory of the heart.” ~ Massieu

I can feel all the good souls who fought so long and so hard for Deaf* equality and justice smiling upon us.  Our cup runneth over. In a good way.

Much peace folks

keep shining and never stop jumping at that sun

(even when it was scorching hot and humind in Rochester – jump we did)

De'VIA Curriculum Working Group at RSD 2014

De’VIA Curriculum Working Group at RSD 2014. We need to photo shop in Kyle Hoffer. Back row Michelle Mansfield-Hom, Laurie Monahan, Tullos Horn, Randy Pituk, Christine Parrotte, Patti Durr, Nancy Rourke, Hinda Kasher. Middle: Emily Blachly and Ellen Mansfield Front row: Karen Chistie, Gino Caci, Takako Kerns, Susan Dupor. Background: De’VIA 2013 mural created at Olathe, Kansas retreat

———-

De’VIA booths, exhibits, retreats, etc

 

Summer 2013

Jun 6-29, 2013 Olathe, Kansas

Deaf Culture Center and Kansas School for the Deaf

De’VIA artists retreat

Group mural created and donated to KSD

Booths at Olathe art festival

 

Fall 2013-2014

November 20? – Feb 7, 2014 NTID Dyer Arts Center

People of the Eye Exhibit

October 11-12 De’VIA marketplace, Brick City NTID 45th Anniversary

 

Spring 2014

March 25 – April 14, 2014 Washburn, Gallaudet

New Wave Exhibit

 

Anniversary
May 25-28, 2014 – exact dates of the De’VIA workshop 25 years ago in Washburn building at Gallaudet before Deaf Way I

 

Summer 2014

June 1-30, 2014: First U.S. Deaf Artists Residency Program (funded by National Endowment for the Arts) – https://www.facebook.com/DeafArtistsResidencyProgram

The HeART of Deaf Culture: Literary and Artistic Expressions of Deafhood available for online subscription – https://www.ntid.rit.edu/educational-materials/?controller=product&product_id=34

June 7, 2014 Orlando, FLA Deaf Art Show

June 27 – July 1, 2014 De’VIA Curriculum Working Group at Rochester School for the Deaf

July 1-5, 2014 NAD Atlanta, GA booths and silent auction

August 5, 2014 – deadline for online submissions of up to 5 De’VIA works for NTID exhibit juried show consideration (self-portraits strongly encouraged) – http://www.rit.edu/ntid/dyerarts/devia25th/call-to-artists

Aug 14-20, 2014 Deaf View Art Retreat Aspen, Colorado (1 night De’VIA reception in Aspen Gallery)

August 30, 2014: Deafestival KY – https://www.facebook.com/pages/DeaFestival-Kentucky/149646748380433

 

Fall 2014

Aug 29 – September 1, 2014 Fords ABE art beats eats Booths

Royal Oaks, Michigan

 

October 4-5, 2014 Ravenswood Art Walk Booths

Chicago, Ill

 

October 17, 2014 Opening Reception De’VIA 25th anniversary Access Gallery in Denver, Colorado Santa Fee Art District Exhibit and reception

Oct 17-18th CAD 110th anniversary

 

October 3 – November 8, 2014 (deadline for submissions Aug 5 see http://www.rit.edu/ntid/dyerarts/devia25th/call-to-artists)

Dyer Arts, Center NTID

De’VIA 25th Anniversary

Oct 10 4 pm Opening Reception of Exhibit

Oct 16-19 Brick City – De’VIA market place Booths?

Nov 7 Deaf-Mute Banquet 25th Anniversary of De’VIA

Nov 8 6 pm Closing Reception of Exhibit

 

Spring 2015

Pepco Edison

Washington, DC

 

Summer 2015

June 10-13, 2015 (tentative dates)  De’VIA retreat –Kansas School for the Deaf and the Deaf Cultural Center

June 13-14, 2015 Downtown Olathe Arts Festival

End of June De’VIA curriculum group TBA

July 15-19, 2015 De’VIA exhibit, Deaf Women United Conference Berkeley, California

July 28-Aug 2 Istanbul, Turkey World Federation of the Deaf booths?

Aug 10-Sept 8, 2015 De’VIA Exhibit at Pepco Edison, Washington, DC

Summer 2016

Michigan De’VIA retreat ?

 

To be determined

future museum and gallery De’VIA  exhibits

 

 

 

What’s your number?

What's Your Number?

What’s Your Number?

Note: see video at bottom for ASL version with pix of some of the guys in prison artwork and ellen and nancys

so i havent been able to sleep for the past two nights

this is unusual for me – rare for me to be wide awake and restless.  sure ive been busy a doin’ running here and there and sure i got lots on my mind but this AWAKE is the type of awake that says – u have someTHING to do.  something specific.  so what i did last night is i just made to quick sketches and then was able to sleep.  Tonight (now morning) the blog calls.

So what is keeping me up?

some Deaf fellows in prison.  I only got to know ‘em for a short while but clearly they have made their mark.  Some good souls (thank you nancy rourke, ellen mansfield, and kc for making this sojourn) and i went to a maximum security prison in western ny to do a De’VIA Deaf View/Image Artwork workshop with some Deaf guys in prison there.

I learned things.  Im still learning things – piecing together what i saw and what i feel.

Number one it feels sad / heavy to walk out FREE.  im not carefree about it.  im just like WOW! 14 years, 30 years, 59 years and counting.  it makes me weep

The guys were mighty sweet – nice, funny, engaged.

This i loved

1- how they helped out their brethren who don’t know ASL understand us and how they helped us to understand them.  I suspect we on the outside dont know the first thing about being collective.

2- how when nancy and ellen explained a few things about their work they were like – OH, Wow, that’s good

i especially loved when W figured out Ellen’s use of fish in her self-portrait was to represent how a fish as stared at in an aquarium – he came to that interpretation on his own but then looked at me and nodded his head in awe as if to say “she’s a clever one, that artist” and i was like yep she is

3. how when W asked Nancy Rourke to serve as his model signing his name sign of W from lower chin to near the ear (indicating a beard) – i thought he just wanted to be able to see it signed so he could then copy / portray it on his own face but instead he was painting red hair and i was like “wow you are painting Nancy!” and he said “yes” and i asked “why did you want to paint nancy signing your namesign W on chin?” and he replied “so she will be calling me name” then he signed it “W on chin W, W” as if someone was calling out to him and i thought that was super cool

4. when H had finished painting his self-portrait, he was struggling to incorporate his name sign (H moved from right to left on his chest) and having someone model the signing for him to look at wasn’t helping, nancy rourke decided to paint H with his name sign.  He was enthralled.  To see his own name.  He then added the H handshapes to his own artwork but asked to keep Nancy’s work for his cell wall.

im like a child5. when KC’s eyes glowed with enthusiasm when Ellen and Nancy held up each of their own works to discuss with the guys and when she chatted with each of them as they worked away.  I didn’t see her writing back and forth with one of the non-signing inmates but she did mention he wrote that he was like a child due to so many years being isolated.  “im like a child, im like a child” kept playing in my mind.  (this man has some serious art skill by the way) later i found the note and it still really just holds on to me

 

some things i didn’t love

1. that all the staff referred to the different folks in prison by their numbers – not by their names

2. that even thought they do have a few folks to sign with – there days do not have the same level of intellectual stimulation as the Hearing folks in prison do

3. that when they left after our good connection, robust handshakes, great interest in coming back – when it was time for them to leave the room as they passed by the window they all looked straight ahead – normally Deaf folks would look through the opening at us and flash a wave, a smile, something but nothing – just staring straight ahead – ahhhhhh “EYES FORWARD” – they probably learned that QUICKLY and HARSHLY

Count the Brushes - the guard counted the number of paint brushes we were bringing in had emphasized we must count and make sure we have the same number coming out (they dont want the guys using them as shank) - we had brought markers and pencils but all of the guys went for the paint and returned them all.  glad we brought them

Count the Brushes – the guard counted the number of paint brushes we were bringing in had emphasized we must count and make sure we have the same number coming out (they dont want the guys using them as shank) – we had brought markers and pencils but all of the guys went for the paint and returned them all. glad we brought them

- especially if they didnt hear it the first time or the second time or the third time…..

4. how mixed i felt as we left.  i felt good we had been there and connected but i felt – i cant find the word – i

felt …. im free and they are not.  that sucks (and yes i know that if they committed a serious crime they should be deprived of their freedom – i just know that correctional facilities RARELY correct and there is boat load of folks who have caused more death and mayhem than some of these folks – im talking about Corporations who are run by PEOPLE who do HORRIBLE things that cause some folks deaths and they NEVER see a single day of jail time) I also know that the Criminal Justice system leans toward white – they are more lenient and less likely to arrest, beat, incarcerate White folks than they are Black and Brown folks that that simply is NOT cool

we can argue that uneducated poor folks do more crime than educated middle and upper class white folks but really we should look at what types of crime do time and what types dont and we should look at why they system does so little towards REHABILITATION

5. how when Mighty Joe Y…. asked me “What is your number?” and i said “Huh?” and he said “oh i mean what is your name?” i was like whoa

Later when i thought about these artworks they made – three incorporated sign language – two used name signs and another was a painting of wife signing ILY.  these men wanted to be called by they name and known and important to someone on the outside.

Its an important question – What is your name?

One that we never think carries any weight or meaning – but for these men to be known by their name is so priceless that that is the dominant feature in the art.

a human by any other name ….

love seems to be the answer and im a studyin’ on it

peace

patti

 

 

 

 

 

For Felix and others like him

I’ve been writing to Felix Garcia for a while now.  He is a Latin@ Deaf* man serving life for a murder his Hearing brother has confessed to.  Felix has been in prison for over 30 years and many of those years were spent alone – amongst hundreds of other men – all Hearing and non-signing – a virtual sentence to solitary confinement for no crime other than being a Deaf man walking.

You can see Felix and other Deaf men and women in the Deaf in Prison documentary that H.E.A.R.D will be screening June 27-29 | 12am-11:59pm.  If you can host a group viewing in your area – let HEARD know so they can list it.  (you can see a list of different locations that are hosting a screening at http://www.behearddc.org/ scroll down for list)

See Trailer for the event and documentary below

I hope more and more Deaf people and allies will get involved with HEARD and start advocating for rights of Deaf people in the criminal justice system (Tmw 6/23 HEARD will be at a Teach-In on the Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA) discussing sexual assault of deaf, blind and disabled persons.)

For an update on Felix’ case – see Pat Bliss’ write up and scroll down for links to sign the petitions – http://deafinprison.wordpress.com/2014/06/18/life-holds-no-guarantees-update-on-felix/

Its hard for me to write about this subject because it feels so hopeless and overwhelming but as Felix always reminds me, our “words help.”  Karen Christie’s poem does a superb job expressing the plight of Deaf, Deafblind and other people in prisons.  Thank you for letting me reprint it here KC.  Thank you Pat Bliss (Felix’ advocate), Talila Lewis (TL) and all the good folks at HEARD and the Deaf in Prison blogsite for all you are doing.

Felix and friends – stay strong.

—————–

For Felix

            And others like him

by Karen Christie

 

I imagine it started as a misunderstanding

And then

the handcuffs

Behind your back

so the right

To remain silent

was never

Understood

But enforced

 

I imagine it led to miscomprehension

of the lawyers vocabulary, the court proceedings,

the uninterpreted expressions

And the right

To be represented

Never represented

You

Your story

Your truth

 

I imagine the worst miscarriage of justice

Was the cruel and unusual sentence

To years of solitary confinement

Among other inmates

Whose physical proximity

Endangered and violated

your arrested life.

———

HEARD trailer for the Deaf in Prison screening and discussion groups

2nd Deaf-Mute Banquet and Film Night

In the Fall of 2013 the 2nd Deaf-Mute banquet was held in Rochester, NY.  The first took place in the Fall of 2012 to honor the 300th birthday of L’epee and the 2nd was to honor his 301st birthday and the 100th anniversary of George W. Veditz’ Preservation of Sign Language film along with other films made in ASL in that year.

part 1 of the panara presentation is at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ev7mKWzhLi4&list=UUuZp0ZP3wIJfHbUDq6rrm_Q

at 2:30 is Veditz (portrayed chris brucker)
at 9:30 is Hotchkiss (pat graybill)
at 2:40 is McGregor (scott cohen)
part 2 of the panara presentation is at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=48BGzunxK_A&list=UUuZp0ZP3wIJfHbUDq6rrm_Q
at start is Mary Williamson Erd (diana pineda)
at 5:15 is gallaudet family (5:20 mark holcomb, 9:35 dorothy wilkins, 13:00 matt salerno)
Snips from the Banquet:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5zehBjL0olM
Characters from the past sharing info with banquet attendees:

George and Bessie Veditz https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lheyFv8KHJI&list=UUuZp0ZP3wIJfHbUDq6rrm_Q&index=7

Robert McGregor https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n_A6PBevCDo&index=6&list=UUuZp0ZP3wIJfHbUDq6rrm_Q

John B. Hotchkiss https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CbGSOVgJDQU&index=5&list=UUuZp0ZP3wIJfHbUDq6rrm_Q

Mary W. Erd https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oq0w6Lb82g0&index=4&list=UUuZp0ZP3wIJfHbUDq6rrm_Q

Agatha Tiegel Hanson https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4NmDrzIUjfQ&index=3&list=UUuZp0ZP3wIJfHbUDq6rrm_Q

Gallaudet Family https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ec1JfdSlqK4&index=2&list=UUuZp0ZP3wIJfHbUDq6rrm_Q

 

Happy BIRTH Day De’VIA

It was 25 years ago today

that a group of artists taught the world to play

Yep May 25 – May 28, 1989 is when a small group of artists and scholars gathered to give a name for works about the Deaf experience – Deaf View/Image Art De’VIA.  Folks had been creating works representing Deaf life and the Deaf-world long before the name and will long after its naming but it was this coming together – this looking for commonalities in motifs, messages, and themes that helped to solidify this art movement and genre.

so happy happy happy BIRTH day Deaf View/Image Art and wishes for many many MORE!

Feel free to leave a note in the comment section – sharing what De’VIA means to you or how and when you first learned of it or the first De’VIA artwork you saw and what it meant to you or the first one you ever made or just a simple note of HAPPY BIRTHDAY De’VIA and miss ya betty and chuck. 

Below is a link to a short video about the birth of De’VIA and a text summary of the video from the HeART of Deaf Culture: Literary and Artistic Expressions of Deafhood by Christie and Durr (2012).  Below the text summary is a listing of recent exhibits and retreats honoring De’VIA’s 25 years.

Video at Deaf Studies Digital Journal (DSDJ) or see HeART of Deaf Culture: Literary and Aristic Expressions of Deafhood – Visual Art / Timeline

http://dsdj.gallaudet.edu/index.php?issue=5&section_id=6&entry_id=198

Text Summary of the video:

De’VIA
Deaf View / Image Art (De’VIA)
Workshop and Manifesto 1989
Length: 19:07

Note: This is a summary of the signed commentaries made in the video on De’VIA and not a verbatim translation. Text summary by Karen Christie and Patti Durr.

“American Deaf Art”
Workshop was held May 25th to May 28th, 1989 before Deaf Way I at Gallaudet University — Co-facilitated by Paul Johnston and Betty G. Miller

Dr. Paul Johnston:
Betty G. Miller and I became good friends. We were of a similar mind and disappointed about the “unfinished” business from Spectrum. The concept of “Deaf Art” was recently introduced, but it had not been fully examined. I didn’t want to see all that fermentation related to the excitement about Deaf art dissolve. I hoped to see it resurrected again. Betty and I discussed this, and decided to submit a proposal for a workshop and invite several artists. Some artists were unable to attend due to job commitments or other conflicts.

Nancy Creighton:
We sent out emails and asked people to come. Some artists like Ann Silver were unable to attend. Harry Williams (namesign HW) had passed away. No, I think maybe at that time he was still alive, but unable to come. I can’t remember who else we asked. We really tried to reach out to many artists.

Paul Johnston:
The artists worked in a variety of mediums and areas: sculpture artists, fabric artists, those working in realism, scholars, and art historians. Not all of us were painters. We had talked about how we wanted all these different artists to come together for an open dialogue.

The Workshop [Intertitle]
Rare footage of the De’VIA workshop in 1989 shot by Lai-Yok Ho

Dr. Betty G. Miller, known as the Mother of De’VIA:
It was at Spectrum that we discussed “Deaf Art.” I’m not going to go into depth about our discussions during the summer sessions at Spectrum, but as a result of these discussions focusing on Deaf Art, people would leave and these discussions would then emerge in Deaf communities around the United States. Therefore, people were engaged in t-a-l-k about Deaf Art; what they were seeing and so forth. That is how it has been up until now. It has been my dream. Today, in being here it has come true.

Dr. Paul Johnston:
…all these emotions were boiling over wanting to come out. But I kept them to myself focusing more on the aesthetics of art. I put my feelings and heart to the side. These were the two competing approaches. They competed until I saw Chuck Baird’s (namesign CB) painting “The Mechanical Ear.” Really, that work just left me stunned. It really hit me so hard. It really shook me to my core.

Nancy Creighton:
That summer was the 2nd Spectrum Deaf Arts conference. I remember Betty being there and this large circle of people discussing what Deaf Art was. I was very naïve and young at that time. During one of the discussions, one person noticed that there were a number of paintings representing people who didn’t have any ears. Inside I thought, so what? What does that have to do with Deaf people and art? I was so puzzled, and didn’t understand what it all meant. I had never seen art in the Deaf genre. I hadn’t seen Betty’s works or any one else’s; ever As a result, when it came my turn to talk, I said, “There is no such thing as Deaf Art — it is simply art by an artist that happens to be deaf.” So you see I had acquired a “Hearing attitude.”

Chuck Baird:
Some people interpret Deaf Art to mean an artist obsessed with the theme of deafness in their paintings; a “rah, rah” Deaf Power kind of thing or works where there is an over-analysis of the ear. From time to time, I would examine that type of work. But overall my work tends to represent the Deaf experience in some way. This doesn’t necessarily mean it overtly screams DEAF (signs index finger as the sign Deaf, but on the palm of his hand instead), or that it includes the obvious slashed ear. In the future, I may do more work with more overt representations of the Deaf experience.

Guy Wonder:
I’m trying to remember how I began to get interested in art. My beginning is kind of vague, but I remember my parents did encourage me to do art: painting, hammering, and creating. They encouraged and supported art as a HOBBY, not as a profession. They would say, “Think about it. You can’t really succeed as a Deaf professional artist. We’ve never seen Deaf people in that type of profession.” Even though I had Deaf parents, there were arguments about this. You need to understand that my parents were from the generation that had experienced a number of wars. They were born during a war, they married, and then I was born during a war. I was a war baby, and my parents were working in factories at this time. So, all their thoughts were about job security that would allow them to afford their home and to budget their money.

They had a sense of huge responsibility. They encouraged me to go to college to be a teacher, a printer or a carpenter. They definitely did NOT send me to college to become an artist. Because they were not aware of any Deaf people who were self-supporting artists, we fought about my ambitions as an artist the whole time I was growing up.

Alex Wilhite:
I learned about Arabic / Muslim art and how it was different from Western art. Arabic/Muslim art was non-objective art, whereas Western art tends to be personal. Western art includes many portraits unlike Muslim art. In my analysis of this work, I noticed a strong use of geometric shapes. Also, I looked at architecture. My father is a contractor, and I liked architecture and construction as well. My father had a lot of left over steel, industrial scraps, and so on. I would sculpt and weld using these materials.

Dr. Deborah Sonnenstrahl:
This teacher/counselor said, “Debbie, I’m very disappointed in you.” “How was my test?” I asked. “Your test was fine,” she replied. “Never mind that. I don’t mean to talk about that.” “Well, what did I do?” I asked. “Why didn’t you major in art?” she asked. “ME? ME? You’re asking ME? ME?” I was so shocked. Someone suggested I major in art? No. Not me. I haven’t shown any of my art in ages. She really specified that I was better suited for art history, but at that time there wasn’t a major in art history. NONE. Art history is good for understanding how artists face problems, solve problems and their struggle. Art courses contribute to understanding. So, I thought, later I could go for my Masters in Art History. I decided to mull over this career path.

Sandi Inches Vasnick:
Deborah Sonnenstrahl’s great influence on me was due to her tremendous LOVE of A R T. I was in awe of her. She would say, “WOW, ART is beautiful! Oh, how I wish I could draw. The beauty of ART!” She’d explain, “See how there is history in this art? Why? Because it communicates CULTURE.” “Right,” I thought with wonder. She would continue, “See how the Greeks showed us their history in art, the Egyptians, and so on.” She would explain everything in the work. “Look at this ear here…” she would say and then explain away. I ran home and started to look at my own artwork and appreciate its beauty.

We are here together so I am able to start to identify with this experience, discover and see how I’m not alone. I can see what each has to offer. It inspires me. I especially appreciate meeting Betty Miller and the discussions of her work. Betty would say, “Yes my work has Deaf themes. There they are.” I could then turn to my own works and see that my work has them too and feel a sense of affirmation. It was a new idea to feel it’s not bad. I don’t need to accept criticism for that. I remember when I was young, my mother and sister would spit on my work because it showed the ugly side of the Deaf world and Deaf education. They’d hide it. I just looked at it and saw it for what it is –“the truth.”

End of vintage footage from De’VIA thinktank 1989

Dr. Paul Johnston:
People brought their works, their slides and we all looked at them. They’d share and present about their work. They were so thrilled to be able to come together and have space to talk about art collectively. Before when we would try to share our perspectives with friends, they would not respond favorably, because they were not from the art world. They didn’t understand. They found it to be overwhelming, whereas all of us immediately and instinctively GOT IT!

We started to note down common motifs and symbols. We noted what they tended to represent. We talked about the motivation behind particular artworks, the type of materials they were interested in working with, and connect these ideas to the artworks.

“Art is the imposing of a pattern on experience, and our aesthetic enjoyment is recognition of the pattern.” — Alfred North Whitehead [Intertitle frame]

We looked at slides. Everyone brought slides of their works and other people’s works and we projected them up on the screen. Slide after slide after slide — thousands of slides. Looking at them one after another, we started to see a pattern. Slide after slide, “Oh strong use of colors” and “focal point tends to be centered.” We as a group saw this pattern. We discussed it, recognized it, and remarked on it. “Oh no ears, no mouths, or oversized mouths, oh hands oppressed and locked up.” We could see this pattern becoming self-evident before our very eyes.

The Name
De’VIA is created when the artist intends to express their Deaf experience through visual art. [Intertitle]

We came up the term De’VIA. Really, originally we decided that the term would be forged in ASL first and the written second. If we came up with the word in written form first and then came up with a sign for it, it would weaken it. Translating from English would diminish it. We wanted it to be stronger. We spent several hours discussing how to sign it. “Deaf Art” would not do. It would not have a big enough impact. It would be too general, like “Deaf education” or “Deaf sports;” too broad. To me, Deaf Art can get distracted to focus on folks who are interested in painting flowers, still-lifes and such. That is not what we were after. We wanted to shift the focus over here. So I raised the question, “What is the difference between Women’s art and Feminist art? What’s the distinguishing difference, the conceptual difference, the boundary?

We discussed all of this and thought of the sign “Deaf Power” art — oh no we felt that would be too much – would seem militant – so we improvised with signs “Deaf view,” “Deaf expression,” “Deaf perspective,” “Deaf, Deaf” (we always had Deaf), “View,” “View what?” Palm hand — an image “Art.” We all looked at that and said YES. Remember we said finger-spelling it out would be forbidden. We decided it would be a signed name first and foremost; “Deaf View/Image Art,” “Deaf View/Image Art.”

Nancy Creighton:
I think Paul (used P on palm of hand — namesign) was strong about the word “view” — we are talking about our point of view, our Deaf experience, how Deaf people view the world. That defined our focus — the Deaf view. Deaf people can do any kind of art but THIS art will show the Deaf View. “Deaf view on palm of hand as the image / artwork” That is how we came up with the name. We did it in sign first.

Deaf De’ View/Image Art VIA De’VIA [De'VIA]

Paul Johnston:
We wanted to thank the Frenchman, Laurent Clerc, for bringing to us French Sign Language (which became ASL here). In memory of his bringing this language that gave birth to our Deaf American culture, we thought of De’ to give it a French feel. De’VIA — a beautiful term.

So we thought, “De’VIA — Why not?” What about the accent ague? We thought it would add to the impact and curiosity; be a hook and people would want to know more. If we had just the term Deaf, some people would see the word and run in the opposite direction. In all honesty, many people don’t respect it. For example many people run from the term Very Special Arts (VSA). Many people see the word deaf and only see disability. De’ is closer to culture.

The Manifesto [Intertitle]

Betty Miller and Nancy Creighton had the concept of writing a manifesto like other art movements have done, such as Dada or surrealism. The artists brought those concepts forward and we saw parallels; to declare, make an announcement, raise the banner, to make it recognized and seal it with a stamp. So our manifesto — remember we only had four days together — was made on a tight schedule, from discussing, to putting into text, to revising to making a large mural representation of De’VIA. Only four days. Wow, when I think of it I really can’t believe it. We really tried our best.

[Image of the original De'VIA manifesto with signatures]

From the De’VIA manifesto (1989)
“De’VIA represents Deaf artists and perceptions based on their Deaf experiences. It uses formal art elements with the intention of expressing innate cultural or physical Deaf experience. These experiences may include Deaf metaphors, Deaf perspectives, and Deaf insight in relationship with the environment (both the natural world and Deaf cultural environment), spiritual and everyday life.” [intertitle]

I want to emphasize to people that the manifesto is not a rule binding, legal document; nothing like that. It is really a seed to see what will grow from it and see what happens.

The Mural [intertitle]

De'VIA Mural 1989 image courtesy of Nancy Creighton

De’VIA Mural 1989 image courtesy of Nancy Creighton

[image of the mural — large painting, black background, several varying sized subtle blue bubbles, Mask / face center image with three primary colored hands coming out of the top of the head, young child with puppet jaw cut into three sections top left next to the word DEAF, smaller Deaf child with puppet jaw and body aid right center above the word WORLD, hand crocheted piece curving from the jaw of the centered masked face to the bottom of the artwork to a horizontal piece, five hands outstretch across the piece from left to right reaching out to the crocheted stream, multicolored triangle frames the center piece of mask / face and crocheted stream with two hands, bottom line of triangle is pure yellow, four threads run from top of frame diagonally across the canvas to bottom.]

Nancy Creighton: [subtitle — Process of creating the mural]
That was a difficult process for us because artists normally work in isolation and independently. In addition, we did not have a lot of time. We started with exercises, which Sandi led (uses the name sign of “pinky finger waved back and forth for Sandi”). Really she did these everyday, but we started with these exercises to get us moving around and interacting. Then we had a paper in which we drafted ideas, and they started to come together. (Pointing to Betty G. Miller who is off screen) Betty got some of her old paintings and cut them up. She cut up her old paintings for the boy with the body aid. [detail image appears]
Sandi had batiks. She cut up some of those and put them up. [detail image appears]. I crocheted the middle textile in the middle. Chuck Baird saw me crocheting and was impressed as he had never seen that before. [detail images appears] And the crochet added meaning to the work. I’m not at all sure what this means. It needs to be reworked. Chuck Baird added hands traveling across the work. He had cut those out and added them. Guy and Alex worked together mostly on the background triangle, adding the colors and Paul did the bubbles and the blue spheres. [detail image]

We put it all together. Not all at once. It was one or two people at a time going up to the piece and working on it. We were all in the same room but we’d go up and work a few at a time due to space. We couldn’t all be up at the canvas at the same time.

[image of the full mural]

Reactions to the De’VIA Manifesto [intertitle]

We had this concept of a big painting created as a team, and we called it our big “signature,” like a statue to display. Unfortunately someone stole it. It was hanging in the Washburn building. Why was it stolen? There are two theories: for its value or because they hated De’VIA. It’s anyone’s guess. There’s a bit of a legend there.

We brought our manifesto to the Deaf Way I conference. We showed some of our new works via slides — Betty G. Miller, CB (Chuck Baird’s namesign), and a few other people showed their work. The audience’s jaws dropped; people were overwhelmed. Remember we only had one hour; that’s all. People kept raising their hands, discussing, and becoming inspired. We just planted the seed and took the first few steps. One person stood up and said, “This is POLITICAL art.” We said, “Whoa, we have a range from political to silly to humorous. We are just introducing it here.”

I remember when we first established De’VIA, people were like, “I want to join. How do I become a member?” I said it’s not an organization. People would ask, “Can I become a De’VIA artist?” There was a bit of misunderstanding, some myths, “Its all political…” Really it was so new. Some thought Devia was a word but it is really an acronym. It took a lot of time and explaining. Some people were immediately resistant, whereas others were supportive. One artist in the group confided, “I feel we have made a mistake. We shouldn’t have set up De’VIA.” “Why?” I asked. “Because we are getting such a negative reaction from some people. I feel like running away,” the artist replied. “Stay firm,” I told her. “Do not give up. The first few years there will be backstabbing but eventually people will open up to it and it will become more accepted.” Some appreciate it. Some don’t get it. It takes time – years and years – for it to be appreciated.

Clips of Chuck Baird from the 1989 De’VIA thinktank — rare footage
“I had this dream, similar to Betty’s. Maybe we were under this larger spirit that sent down this blessing, which reached out and touched each of us around that time; 1971 around then. And we met each other and started to influence each other and this was all under someone greater than us — their plan. For Deaf View / Image Art. For A-R-T. Deaf, their A-R-T.

Clip of De’VIA artists who coined the term, created the manifeso and the signature mural of De’VIA in 1989 signing “Deaf View / Image Art” then stepping away to reveal the mixed media work.

Scrolling text:
The signatories were:
Dr. Betty G. Miller, painter;
Dr. Paul Johnston, sculptor;
Dr. Deborah M. Sonnenstrahl, art historian;
Chuck Baird, painter;
Guy Wonder, sculptor;
Alex Wilhite, painter;
Sandi Inches Vasnick, fiber artist;
Nancy Creighton, fiber artist;
And Lai-Yok Ho, video artist.

Recent events honoring De’VIA’s 25th anniversary:

De’VIA booths, exhibits, retreats, etc

 

Summer 2013

Jun 6-29, 2013 Olathe, Kansas

Deaf Culture Center and Kansas School for the Deaf

De’VIA artists retreat

Group mural created and donated to KSD

Booths at Olathe art festival

De'VIA mural 2013 - image courtesy of the Deaf Cultural Center

De’VIA mural 2013 – image courtesy of the Deaf Cultural Center

 

Fall 2013-2014

November 20? – Feb 7, 2014 NTID Dyer Arts Center

People of the Eye Exhibit

October 11-12 De’VIA marketplace, Brick City NTID 45th Anniversary

 

Spring 2014

March 25 – April 14, 2014 Washburn, Gallaudet

New Wave Exhibit

 

May 25-28, 2014 – exact dates of the De’VIA workshop 25 years ago in Washburn building at Gallaudet before Deaf Way I

 

Summer 2014

June 7, 2014 Orlando, FLA Deaf Art Show

July 1-5, 2014 NAD Atlanta, GA booths and silent auction

Aug 14-20, 2014 Deaf View Art Retreat Aspen, Colorado (1 night De’VIA reception in Aspen Gallery)

 

Fall 2014

Aug 29 – September 1, 2014 Fords ABE art beats eats Booths

Royal Oaks, Michigan

 

October 4-5, 2014 Ravenswood Art Walk Booths

Chicago, Ill

 

October 17, 2014 Opening Reception De’VIA 25th anniversary Access Gallery in Denver, Colorado Santa Fee Art District Exhibit and reception

Oct 17-18th CAD 110th anniversary

 

October 3 – November 8, 2014 (deadline for submissions Aug 5 see http://www.rit.edu/ntid/dyerarts/devia25th/call-to-artists)

Dyer Arts, Center NTID

De’VIA 25th Anniversary

Oct 10 4 pm Opening Reception of Exhibit

Oct 16-19 Brick City – De’VIA market place Booths?

Nov 7 Deaf-Mute Banquet 25th Anniversary of De’VIA

Nov 8 6 pm Closing Reception of Exhibit

 

Spring 2015

May???? Pepco Edison

Washington, DC

 

Summer 2015

De’VIA retreat –Kansas School for the Deaf and the Deaf Cultural Center ?

 

July 28-Aug 2 Istanbul, Turkey

World Federation of the Deaf booths

 

Summer 2016

Michigan De’VIA retreat ?

 

To be determined

Memorial Art Gallery, Rochester NY

NMWA, Washington DC

Others?

 

 

Option Schools and Alliances and Elephants – OH NO!

The Elephant in the Deaf Room by Nanc y Rourke

The Elephant in the Deaf Room by Nancy Rourke

CEASD & OPTION INC.

so a few weeks ago CEASD Conference of Educational Administrators of Schools and Programs for the Deaf http://www.ceasd.org/ met in Indiana and they had a presentation / panel about ALLIANCES AND PARTNERSHIPS with Option Schools, Inc.  Option Schools are Oral /Aural Only programs – IE they EXCLUDE / BAN/ DENY ASL  http://optionschools.org/

NAD & AGB & CEASD

The NAD National Association of the Deaf was there too.  the NAD already serves on an ALLIANCE with the AG Bell Association (AG Bell Association is the # 1 – Oral / Aural Only promotor – IE they EXCLUDE / BAN / DENY ASL and refuses to apologize for its offensive letter to Pepsi portraying signing Deaf folks as isolated and dependent).  See the Deaf and Hard of Hearing Alliance membership http://www.dhhainfo.com/members/ to see that the NAD (and CEASD) has been k-i-s-s-i-n-g with AG Bell for a mighty long time now.

CEASD & NAD & OPTION INC.

Option Schools, Inc is having a conference in Buffalo, NY  May 18-21, 2014 and CEASD and the NAD will be there.

This is very De Ja Vu folks.

we already been there, done that.

ie – we already tried to work with the Oralist Oppressors.

NOTE: there is nothing wrong with developing oral skills – there is EVERYTHING wrong with insisting it is the only / exclusive / mandatory way to “function” in society and listening and talking create independence.  Speaking and listening does not equate intelligence nor independence folks.  The notion that to speak and listen (ie Oralism) is superior to being Deaf  is bigotry and bias speaking .  Audism anyone?

from Option Schools, Inc website:

Our Vision

OPTION Schools, Inc. will be a recognized authority on listening and spoken language education for children with hearing loss. We will be known for our work in, and dedication to helping children with hearing loss to listen and talk and reach their full potential. We will continue to provide a wide variety of programs and services that will increase the effectiveness of schools and centers that teach children with hearing loss. We will be an unfailing source of information and training for our members, and in our field.

Yawn!

this is so same ole same ole

so why praise tell is the CEASD and the NAD teaming up with Optionless schools?

(we call them optionLESS because they truly are – they are denying Deaf children the right to a natural and fully accessible language and that goes against 4 International groups saying Deaf children have a RIGHT to a natural signed language – http://audismfreeamerica.blogspot.com/2011/10/international-documents-asserting.html)

Why is CEASD and the NAD making ALLIANCES with OptionLESS schools & AG Bell Association?

one Deaf leader in Facebook said with dismay “I put my trust in our Deaf leaders to do right by the Deaf children”

yep. Tis a pity.

why oh why?

NAD is saying its not happy happy about OptionLESS schools inc and CEASD k-i-s-s-i-n-g cuz NAD got stung by some Option School folks in the FLA legislative meetings

bbuuuuuuttttttt – it supports CEASD cuz it supports the Alice Cogswell and Anne Sullivan Macy bill – See HR 4040

(but there really isnt much to see)

http://beta.congress.gov/bill/113th-congress/house-bill/4040

This bill was never impressive cuz its like  ‘Oral only is ok’

(which we know it is NOT)

and now the bill has been expanded to include Blind and Deafblind folks and the Blind provisions are MUCH STRONGER than the provisions originated by the NAD and CEASD.  The blind folks are asserting their rights mighty nicely methink.  (ie we dont see any provision saying the denial of the use of a cane or braille is ok)

the CEASD’s reasons for having an ALLIANCE with OptionLESS schools has not be clearly articulated.

According to tweets from the Indiana CEASD conference – CEASD said the big elephant in the room was Option Schools going after Deaf school funding while OPTION Inc said the big elephant was that folks dont understand what Option Inc is about.

really the BIGGEST ELEPHANT IN THE ROOM IS – ORALISM

Oralism is THE DENIAL OF A NATURAL SIGNED LANGUAGE

ORALISM CAN NOT BE DONE WITH OUT EXCLUSIONARY AND ABUSIVE PRACTICES.  THAT IS THE BIGGEST ELEPHANT IN THE ROOM

WILL CEASD AND/OR NAD STATE THIS FACT IN BUFFALO, NY NEXT WEEK?

not likely

why?

cuz when u put money over children

cuz when u pursue unjust and unwise ALLIANCES

cuz when u pretend that Option Schools, Inc really provide options

cuz when u draft bills that are devoted to saving your schools and positions and not saving the  children

cuz when u create illusions of equality (Deaf at EHDI, Deaf on ALLIANCES with AG Bell, Deaf at Option Conferences) without any demands for equality of condition for the CHILDREN

cuz when u dont address the TRUE elphant in the room

cuz when u dont release the Language Deprivation bill by Dec 1 as promised (hello, NAD we see you)

cuz when u wheel and deal – gala here, meeting there, super bowl rah rah rah

cuz when u never invest in ASL and the Deaf -world – always fighting for things to serve the elite and privileged over the most down trodden of us

cuz when u dont heed the words and actions of our ancestors who have already encountered the deadly tango with the Oral / Aural ONLYIST

cuz when u dont know history

you fail the children

miserably!

There is NOTHING wrong with demanding that Deaf children have a right to a fully natural and accessible signed language.  They can also learn oral and aural skills

There is EVERYTHING wrong with being in alliance with organizations, groups, associations, and business (ie Inc and Ltds) that advocate for the denial of ASL and for oral / aural ONLY

sure you can go the route of “you get more flies with honey” or whatever that bloody idiom is

or the one about “building bridges instead of burning” them but

the truth is – we dont want flies we want justice

the truth is – the bridge was burned a long time ago and is STILL burning – anytime an organization, institution, inc, ltd commits itself to be Oral / Aural ONLY – it is burning the bridge

the CEASD and NAD crossing over the burning bridge thinking its gonna give them a wee measure to limp a long a bit more is reckless and UNJUST

LGBTQ have not gained the rights they are gaining today by having acquiesced to the oppressors

African-Americans have not gained the rights they have today by acquiescing to the oppressors

Women have not gained the rights they have today by acquiescing to the oppressors

etc

CEASD and NAD – ya can continue down this path and we know where it will lead – we already done played this one out – u r ushering in the 2nd wave of Oralism because u feel there is no other choice but in fact we do have OPTIONS

awake and stand

if u must be in Buffalo – you MUST stand and testify to all the abuse that goes on under the cloak of “restoring the Deaf to society” IE ORALISM

cuz it still goes on

kids are still being rapped on the hand with rulers and YARD STICKS (this happened 2 years ago to a Deaf 16 year old man (yes 16 is considered legal age in some states) with a CI, who said to his speech pathologist – i dont want to do speech therapy any more – WHACK! Take that)

there is more folks – MUCH MORE

AWAKE

OH and check out how effective the visibility at EHDI is working out for Deaf folks – audiologist blogs that Deaf signing folks at EHDI made a parent cry – ahhh inclusion

STAND

We demand it cuz Deaf folks are worth it

or dont and SINK

Remember and heed the words of the first president of the National Association of the Deaf.  NAD was founded in 1880 and 2 scores later, six years before his death, The McGregor was still calling for the NAD to stand strong and do what it was formed to do – oppose oppression via oralism.

Excerpt from Robert McGregor's Address to the NADY December 1920

Excerpt from Robert McGregor’s Address to the NAD December 1920

See Robert P. McGregor’s Irishman’s Flea – that has great relevancy today:

http://videocatalog.gallaudet.edu/?video=2515

In this 1913 classic film, The McGregor compares an elusive and pesky flea to the irksome myth of the “restored to society deaf” which can never be found because they do not exist.

Ella Mae Lentz’s classic vlog about the true Elephant in the room – ORALISM – which depends on falsehoods and deceit and ALLIANCES to continue its reign of error.

AGBell: the Elephant in the Deaf Room

 

 

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